Theoretical framework

This WP develops new thinking about religious diversity and secularism or laïcité. It is an interlinked component for the entire RELIGARE project in that it aims to provide a theoretical and methodological steer to and reflection of each of the other substantive WPs, while being informed by the latter’s concrete results. European State systems have been profoundly influenced by an historical shift towards secularism, developed as a way of managing religious conflict, and the limitations imposed upon scientific thought. Interestingly, these assumptions are accepted, at least by a section of the elites beyond the Euro-American sphere, although they appear to now be eclipsed by the ostensible rise of religious consciousness and expression. Meanwhile, European states and their different institutions and knowledge regimes have been profoundly conditioned by their own experiences and the dominant trends within Christianity, be it in its Orthodox, Catholic, or Protestant (Lutheran, Anglican, etc.) forms, as well as having developed varying post-Enlightenment state-religion arrangements.

The Place of Religion in European Union Law and Policy

Image: 
Author(s): 
Sergio Carrera & Joanna Parkin
Publication: 
RELIGARE Working Paper No. 1
Abstract: 

While the EU has no explicit legal competence in the sphere of religion and the management of relations with faith communities, religions concerns have taken on increasing importance within the legal and institutional framework and policy discourses of the EU in the last years. This paper provides an overview of how religion and issues of religious diversity are being framed and addressed in EU law and policy by undertaking a critical analysis of the ways in which EU law and policy deal with, engage and understand religion at the policy level of the European Commission.

Legal Practice and Cultural Diversity

Image: 
Author(s): 
Ralph Grillo, Roger Ballard, Alessandro Ferrari, Andre Hoekema, Marcel Maussen and Prakash Shah

Publication: Book, Ashgate Publishing Limited, August 2009

Abstract:

This collection considers how contemporary cultural and religious diversity challenges legal practice, how legal practice responds to that challenge, and how practice is changing in the encounter with the cultural diversity occasioned by largescale, post-war immigration.

 

For more information, please visit:

Yearbook of Muslims in Europe

Image: 
Author(s): 
Jørgen S. Nielsen, Samim Akgönül, Ahmet Alibašić, Brigitte Maréchal, Christian Moe
Abstract: 

The presence of Muslims in Europe has attracted increasing attention over the last two, three decades. Researchers started devoting attention to the subject during the mid- and late 1980s. In the last two decades it has also attracted growing political attention and public debate. The events of 11 September 2001 in New York and Washington DC, followed by a number of other terrorist attacks, dramatically increased the general interest in Islam and Muslims, now often driven not only by security considerations, but also by social apprehension. It has become clear from these events that there is a serious lack of reliable and up-to-date information about the situation of Muslims in individual European countries.

For more information, see:
http://www.brill.nl/brochures/yme2010.pdf

 

Shari’a As Discourse. Legal Traditions and the Encounter with Europe

Author(s): 
Jørgen S. Nielsen and Lisbet Christoffersen
Publication: 
Book, Ashgate Publishing
Abstract: 

The book exposes some of the various issues raised in relation to Muslim communities in Europe, by putting the intellectual and legal traditions into dialogue. It brings together a number of scholars to provide a valuable reference for all those interested in exploring how Muslims and non-Muslims view Shari’a law.

To order, please visit:

http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&calcTitle=1&title_id=9318&edition_id=9605

Believing in Norway, Beliefs in Norway: A “Humanitarian Great Power” under Globalization

Image: 
Author(s): 
Kjell Å Modéer and Hanne Petersen
Publication: 
Report, Norwegian Helsinki Committee, No. 3/2009, University of Oslo
Abstract: 

The work with this report underlines the general need for collective self-reflection in a time of cognitive and societal change. Traditionally the state has transformed its norms with help of legislation and judicial decisions. In the current situation, however, this is not sufficient. It is increasingly necessary to identify the vague value-based structures and immanent and informal powers of the late modern society.

Aykan Erdemir

Name: 
Aykan
Surname: 
Erdemir
Picture: 
Role in the project: 
Researcher

Aykan Erdemir is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology of Middle East Technical University (METU) where he teaches courses on social and political anthropology, and the anthropology of Europe and the Middle East. He is also the Deputy Dean of the Graduate School of Social Sciences and the Director of the German-Turkish Masters Program in Social Sciences, a dual-diploma program of Humboldt-Universität and METU.

Zana Citak

Name: 
Zana
Surname: 
Citak
Picture: 
Role in the project: 
Researcher

Zana Citak is Vice-Chair of the Department of International Relations at Middle East Technical University. She works on issues in secularism, religion, nationalism, and politics. Her current research examines Islam in Europe from a comparative perspective.

Smita Tewari Jassal

Name: 
Smita Tewari
Surname: 
Jassal
Picture: 
Role in the project: 
Researcher

Smita Tewari Jassal has been at the graduate School of Social Sciences, METU since 2009. She was the Haas Visiting Professor in Anthropology at Brandeis University from 2008-2009. She has taught at Columbia University and at SAIS, Johns Hopkins University. Over the last decade she researched Indian culture and society in the context of human rights, the role of women and development and issues of politics and society in the Indian subcontinent.

Tugba Tanyeri Erdemir

Name: 
Tugba Tanyeri
Surname: 
Erdemir
Picture: 
Role in the project: 
Researcher

Tugba Tanyeri Erdemir is the Director of the Science and Technology Museum, and a member of the Executive Board of the Centre for Society and Science at Middle East Technical University. Dr Tanyeri-Erdemir also serves on the Scientific Board of the Alevi Institute. She has directed comparative projects on competitive sharing of religious sites and regulation and management of religious sites. She has extensive experience in dissemination and communication of scientific issues to the public.

Theoretical framework

This team develops new thinking about religious diversity and secularism or laïcité. It is an interlinked component for the entire RELIGARE project in that it aims to provide a theoretical and methodological steer to and reflection of each of the other substantive research fields, while being informed by the latter’s concrete results. European State systems have been profoundly influenced by an historical shift towards secularism, developed as a way of managing religious conflict, and the limitations imposed upon scientific thought.

Syndicate content